Remembering Martin Luther King in 2014

The following is from a previous post on this blog and my former Opera blog with a few tweaks.

I can say that I do not agree with the direction of some of his political beliefs that went beyond fighting for equal rights for blacks and other minorities who experienced legal racial discrimination. But the fact that he non violently fought and put his life on the line for the civil rights of others will never diminish in my heart.

My recollection of Dr. Martin Luther King was one of taking a courageous stand against day by day racism and legal segregation. I remember the media reports of him spending time in jail for peaceful protests for rights for people of color that are so easily acquired today. I remember watching on TV former President Harry Truman, a Democrat calling Dr. King a trouble maker. When reporters reminded him that Dr. King had been given the Nobel Peace Prize, former President Truman’s response was, “I did not give it to him.” My mother and grandmother who were also watching TV with me were appalled at former President Truman’s remarks.

I remember various white people all over the country who were Democrats and Republicans also expressing that Dr King and other civil rights leaders both white and black were trouble makers. Some expressed as did the late Senator Barry Goldwater (as seen in the HBO documentary on him) that Blacks wanted their rights too fast and that they would have to wait. What was really being said is that yes we have denied you rights as citizens, which we enjoy, but you must wait until we are ready to do the right thing. Dr. King’s peaceful actions said NO in high volumes. I wonder if people who thought like the late Senator Goldwater, realized how wrong they were.

Martin Luther King was assassinated in the spring of my junior year in high school. On that day my father’s co-worker had a bit of a personal connection. His co-worker’s son in-law assaulted a passenger on a Philly bus. He assaulted the passenger for saying that Dr. King had died with the garbage. From a legal criminal standpoint, he came to regret assaulting that passenger. Dr. King was in Memphis Tennessee when he was assassinated to support sanitation workers’ protest of low wages and poor working conditions.

I believe Dr. King would not be happy today. I continue to agree with Aaron McGruder‘s creation (which is documented in Juan William’s book, Enough) of an Older Dr. King on his Cartoon Network show The Boondocks. Dr. King is in a Church looking out at high school dropouts, gangsta rappers in fistfights, young teenage mothers dressing scantily. He can hear them calling each other the “N” word. This older version of Dr. King looks out and says, “Is this it? This is what I got all those a-whippings for?”

We have to do better by his legacy

On This Day in 1968: A Few Wrong Reactions

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I was a junior in high school on this day April 4, 1968. Dr. Martin Luther King was in Memphis, Tennessee to support the striking garbage workers and was assassinated. After the assassination of Dr. King made the news, a white man on a Philly trolley joked about Dr. King dying with the garbage. On that same trolley, a young black man had trouble ignoring what he heard. I think it was best for the response to be no more than a verbal one, but he responded to the put down of Dr. King by punching the man in the mouth. That might have made the young man feel good at the time, but I wonder how he felt later dealing with the police and the charges brought up against him in court.

After school that day, I along with other students headed home on the #26 bus. Philly high school students rode back and forth to school with the general public and not on yellow school buses. We always packed the bus. A few white men and male high school students from a nearby parochial school sitting in the back and getting off the bus at back door suffered punches from black male students except for one. Pete, a white high school student lived in the neighborhood and was like family to those who lived on his block. The neighborhood guys barricaded him from the punches.

Dr. King suffered much as a civil rights leader, especially due to his belief in non-violence. Regardless of what he verbally and physically endured, you never heard about him talking nasty and insulting to anyone. You never heard about getting physical with anyone. These reactions on a Philly trolley and bus to Dr. King’s death were wrong. They were an affront to his non-violent legacy.

In Remembrance of Dr. Martin Luther King

On Monday, we observe the Martin Luther King holiday, but today is the anniversary of his birth. Today,  I can say that I do not agree with the direction of some of his politics that went beyond fighting for equal rights for blacks and other minorities who experienced legal racial discrimination. But the fact that he non violently fought and put his life on the line for the civil rights of others will never diminish in my heart.   With the age and a couple of other update tweaks, the following is my 2007 salute to Dr. King blog post from my former blog.

My recollection of Dr. Martin Luther King who would have turn 82 today was one of taking a courageous stand against day by day racism and legal segregation. I remember the media reports of him spending time in jail for peaceful protests for rights for people of color that are so easily acquired today. I remember watching on TV former President Harry Truman calling Dr. King a trouble maker. When reporters reminded him that Dr. King had been given the Nobel Peace Prize, former President Truman’s response was, “I did not give it to him.” My mother and grandmother who were also watching TV with me were appalled at former President Truman’s remarks.

I remember various white people all over the country who were Democrats and Republicans also expressing that Dr King and other civil rights leaders both white and black were trouble makers. Some expressed as did the late Senator Barry Goldwater (as seen in the HBO documentary on him) that Blacks wanted their rights too fast and that they would have to wait. What was really being said is that yes we have denied you rights as citizens, which we enjoy, but you must wait until we are ready to do the right thing. Dr. King’s peaceful actions said NO in high volumes. I wonder if people who thought like the late Senator Goldwater, realized how wrong they were.

Martin Luther King was assassinated in the spring of my junior year in high school. On that day my father’s co-worker had a bit of a personal connection. His co-worker’s son in-law assaulted a passenger on a Philly bus. He assaulted the passenger for saying that Dr. King had died with the garbage. From a legal criminal standpoint, he came to regret assaulting that passenger. Dr. King was in Memphis Tennessee when he was assassinated to support sanitation workers’ protest of low wages and poor working conditions.

Now, I do believe Dr. King would not be happy today. I agree with Aaron McGruder‘s creation (which is documented in Juan William’s book, Enough) of an Older Dr. King on his Cartoon Network show The Boondocks. Dr. King is in a Church looking out at high school dropouts, gangsta rappers in fistfights, young teenage mothers dressing scantily. He can hear them calling each other the “N” word. This older version of Dr. King looks out and says, ‘Is this it? This is what I got all those a-whippings for?”

We have to do better by his legacy

 

Discovering Life and Liberty

I tuned at the mid-point of the Mike Gallagher talk radio program on Friday. He was not there that day, but Vicki Middleton who I had never heard of before was his guest host. Her husband, Jim Middleton joined her. They are both of Life and Liberty. The program was excellent. When I tuned in, the discussion was on Islam and Sharia Law concerns, which too many people in this country continue to ignore.  The topic moved on to Martin Luther King and historical inaccuracies shared by David Barton of WallBuilders. that many of us were taught.

The Martin Luther King segment with guest Thomas E. Woods was a somewhat painful to hear, even though it was really no surprise to me about Dr. King being into socialism and redistribution of wealth. I guess it was hearing it broadcast in the open that made it painful. I pretty much see Dr. King from my growing up days (He was shot down when I was in high school). I viewed Dr. King as the strongest non violent fighter for equal rights for those who lived under legal discrimination.

As I typed this post, I listened to the Life and Liberty radio broadcast online at http://www.ksky.com. The program’s roots are in the Lord. I will be listening to this Saturday program from time to time at around 4:00 pm. eastern. The program is from Texas where it advertises at its central air time of 3:00 pm.  I also found Life and Liberty on Facebook and hit the ‘like’ button.  Here is some video of one of the radio broadcast.